Kremlin Spokesman Warns Against Syria Strike

Kremlin Spokesman Warns Against Syria Strike

Opposition Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn said it is "vital that parliament has the chance to debate and decide in advance" of any military action, which he warned "risks a unsafe escalation of the conflict".

But the pinpoint strike did not deter Assad and U.S. officials, speaking on condition of anonymity, have since investigated as many as 10 suspected chemical attacks.

The United States, Britain and France made the case at the United Nations on Friday for military action against Syria, saying President Bashar al-Assad's repeated use of chemical weapons posed a threat to the world.

The government said it is "highly likely" that Assad is responsible for the Douma attack, with ministers agreeing "it was vital that the use of chemical weapons did not go unchallenged".

But a special hotline for the United States and Russian militaries to communicate about operations in Syria is active and being used by both sides, Moscow said Thursday.

Russian Federation is a major backer of the government of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad in the country's civil war, and strongly opposes the USA claim that Syrian government forces attacked a rebel-held town near Damascus on Saturday with chemical weapons.

British Prime Minister Theresa May was due to hold an emergency cabinet meeting amid speculation she will support USA action against the Syrian regime.

Opposition lawmakers have called on May to give Parliament a vote before committing British troops.

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He stressed on two points - the first one was to be a responsible citizen by following the law and protecting the Constitution. The situation was said to be under control as authorities imposed prohibitory conditions and deployed additional police force.

But British involvement in further military intervention is controversial at home, in a country still haunted by its role in the US-led invasion of Iraq.

May is not obliged to win parliament's approval, but a non-binding constitutional convention to do so has been established since a 2003 vote on joining the US -led invasion of Iraq.

British lawmakers voted down taking military against Damascus in 2013, in what was widely viewed as an assertion of parliamentary sovereignty on the use of force. A YouGov poll showed just one in five members of the public support a strike on Syria.

The statement made no reference to whether Parliament would be given a say on military action - prompting renewed concerns among opposition parties and some Tory MPs that Mrs May is prepared to go ahead without a Commons vote.

"Cabinet agreed on the need to take action to alleviate humanitarian distress and to deter the further use of chemical weapons..."

The country often has restricted itself to supporting roles, such as the participation of reconnaissance jets in the worldwide campaign against the Islamic State group.

Speaking to congress at a hearing of the House Armed Services Committee on Thursday, Mattis said he believed a chemical attack had taken place and blamed Russian Federation for being complicit in Syrian government's possession of chemical weapons.

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